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20121201
20121201
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on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center for four years. most americans don't realize he was a congressman. many don't even know he was president. >> by your going to change that. >> yes. he was this enormously courageous congressman. the first congressman to stand up and call for emancipation before lincoln even knew how to spell the word. >> we will get back to emancipation and the abolition movement. someone said to me the other day i have read to biographies of joh
to say because i am from washington and because it is halloween and because i have three children, all of them love to trick or treat our will report that the most popular costume that has come up lately is binders full of women. what this halloween costume looks like is you put your arms in the binder, it is not a jack in the box but jacqueline in the box and jacqueline pops out of a folder in the halloween costume. who said we were dull in washington? we are very creative. i am going to tell the story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlantic story that came out in 2010 and basically i had been vacationing in a town for a long time which was a prosperous working-class town and one year i went there a bit seemed there are not many men are round. i was seeing him in church or the fair grounds or driving down the street ritter trucks doing construction. this was the height of the housing collapse that anita hill talked-about. men were finding a hard time. we talked about the man session and loss of manufacturing jobs and i became curious abo
side, and when they get out, there's huge risks, but i would urge people in washington would not underestimate the price paid by the debt ceiling debacle of last year. it was not that we downgraded our debt and then our interest rates didn't change. that's a misreading. what happened is that the financial markets are spooked by the uncertainty in washington and by the belief to win anything no matter how stupid, and let us be clear, not raising the debt ceiling on the table again is as stupid a policy as anyone can imagine. the whole debt ceiling doesn't make sense, and the idea you will not raise it when you need to is really playing some form of roulette that's not appropriate. there's a number of changes sense the act that i want to emphasize. in addition to the fact the financial risks are less obvious and pressing on the american public as was mentioned in the last session, the economy is international in the way it was not in 1990. that is, we can talk in 1990 about raising corporate taxes and lowering the tax on dividends, for example, which was one of the policies sug
seven or 800 points but washington will get the message. what i fear and what i think is the risk is that they will fix it with a patch that is short-term, it's not substantive, it doesn't have a lot of nutritional content to it and we are going to be right back in again and again. markets will lose confidence. we will gradually lose our global credibility as an economic leader. we might see our credit rating damaged more over time. and it is the slow defense of the united states that is the real risk. the fiscal cliff is something that can be fixed fairly easily. >> host: finally, i would like to go back, david rothkopf come to your comments about government. national government being neanderthal it. there was a throwaway line of sight while we are still organized as nation states economically. again, where we going in the future. >> i think we will see the future. because we live in geographic proximity to one another, we also have city governments, state governments in the united states, we have a federal government in the united states and it's only natural that another layer
in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about an hour ten minutes. >>> hello, everyone, want i want to welcome you to the program which features an al star lineup of authors who will be doing the most recent book on the supreme court. i'm a professor here at georgetown. and executive directer of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event, and i'd like to thank our deputy directer dory burn seen to putting it together. before i turn the program over to our moderators, i'd like to remind thearch after the program, we have a reception following in which you'll gate chance to have all your newly purchased books signed by the authors. have a word or two with the authors, hopefully, and as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderators. today for today's program tony morrow. tony needs no introduction at all. i'll keep it short and tell you that tony has long been one of the nation's most influential journalists covering the supreme
, and there are two types of people in washington. those who really enjoy detailed discussion about senate procedure, and those who don't. welcome. i can see which category you fit into. we have a great panel today to discuss something that's become more and more important moving forward, especially in the current nature of congress where the lines seem to be more and more stark and obvious than as any time as i've been in washington. we have four experts discussing the developments in --cepsbly the filibuster, but the discussion will touch on other areas of senate procedure and precedent, and you'll see a distinction between the two, senate rules and senate precedence on the other. you'll hear from four individuals who have a depth of experience in these matters that, i think, is unrivaled in the city. i'll introduce them briefly so they can turn it over to the discussion. i'll lead off with no particular order, james walden speaking first, working in the house of representatives and the senate, serving as the senate hearing committee. he's an adjunct professor in the department of politics in the
the party line seemed to be more stark and obvious than they were then some of my early days in washington. we have four experts who will discuss the developments and essentially the filibuster. it has to do with senate procedure and presidents and senate rules and senate precedents on the other. you're going to hear from for individuals with a depth of experience in these matters. let me introduce everyone. in no particular border, we have james wallner from guesswork for the house and the senate and he currently serves as executive director and an adjunct professor in the congressional and presidential studies program he has a masters and phd in politics. james is a very astute observer in this senate. i can tell you from first-hand experience. the second speaker will be norman ornstein. he is a long-term observer of politics and he is an analyst at cbs news. he is the author of several books, which you may have read. the broken branch, how congress is failing america, and the permanent campaign of the future, and most recently, it's even worse than it looks, the new politics of extremis
when i first came to washington after my doctorate and one of the first books i was exposed to was tom's book titled the state of ridge, where the government sponsored enterprise in the financial crisis, clearly tom was years ahead of his time at his predictions turned out to be all too accurate. a very long track record of being one of the 04 most forecasters of the state of the financial-services industry but when he is not writing books he spends his time as a fellow at the center for dance to governmental studies at johns hopkins university. tom also served as staff on the financial crisis inquiry commission and in my opinion there are a few things i would disagree with the commission's findings one thing i know for certain is the commission's report was stronger because of tom's involvement. the book is also informed largely by tom's experience on commission staff. we are fortunate to have with us alex pollock to offer his thoughts on the book. alex is resident fellow at the american enterprise institute. i got to know alex a decade ago when he was president and chief operating of
, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i look at this from two perspective, the global forces that affect america, american jews, and israel, everything from the shift of power to united states and the west to china and the east hours of globalization in the digital era. how to deal with the 1.6 muslims in the world, the threat of iranian nuclear power, and i also look at internal threats, low birthrates, assimilation, and again, whether we can, in effect, succeed at the time when we are more successful than ever in being integrated to our society. it's a new know mom that. --
as one and it's in the book washington state university, the student wrote a play called the passion of offending of a buddy. he put it on the ticket. he put it everywhere. it isn't easily defended and this african-american student had the absolute goal of defending everybody and he made a point of it defending it all throughout. the university worked with students angry about the content of the play and they told them to stand up in the middle and shout i am offended which is ironic because that is the point of the play. it's going to go over badly. and the university president actually defended the next day. the students that disrupted the play as saying this was a very irresponsible exercise of the freedom of speech on the part of the angry mob of students that shut down the play and its stunning that they got that one. it's a great point and the censorship campuses. >> my name is dave clemens from ontario. i was wondering if you see any room for fire to expand into canada. i think there's a great group in canada. my only thing is i think the death of a nonprofit caused them to sp
people of blindness. now imagine entire washington metro area. about 3 million people. imagine all those people blind. now they can see. that's not -- that's not an obscure story. it's not an obscure story in the world of people. people know about the hospital. people travel from all over the world to go to the hospital to train to bring the same programs to their countries. it becomes a movement to end needless blindness. it's one example you might say that's -- got to be an exception. hundreds and hundreds of stories like that. and those are the stories that are transforming the global economy. not just the economy, societies building the future. >> so as you say in the next twenty years, 3 billion more people will enter to the world of economic freedom or another least -- >> right cognitive freedom. economic freedom. >> is the wild west does it need to be managed? how should it be managed? >> well,, you know, i like the core metaphor in describing the economy and the interaction of the economy and the society is reinforced. and when we go the rain forest whether it's the pacific north
. want to pass the microphone over to him. eddie is a former nfl player. washington redskins, someone i interviewed for an outside lines peace of mind. before kurt warner were stepping toward saying i'm not going let my kid football. eddie was one of the voices that got the conversation started back then. eddie, why adopt you tell us about your perspective an the decision you made with your son. >> tom, thanks. congratulations to the board. thank you for your great work, scott, u.s.a. football. i played the game 27 of years of my life has been devoted to the game. eight years professionally. there's consequences to the game. it comes along with it. at the end of the day, you know, working as a commission of sports league, being involved with two -- actually three full-contact leagues in virginia, the thing i have seen since i have been retired and i've been training. i'm on a training facility that works with young athletes from ages to six to pro. the issue is education, and the reality between the education and the reality is this. is that the coaches, the that coach the game, whether
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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